2013 - 2014
Undergraduate Catalogue

Political Science

Office: Beatty Hall, Room 314

Telephone: 410-617-2742

Website: www.loyola.edu/politicalscience

FACULTY

Chair: Michael G. Franz, Professor

Professors: Michael G. Franz; Diana J. Schaub

Associate Professors: Douglas B. Harris; Janine P. Holc; Kevin W. Hula; William I. Kitchin; Donald T. Wolfe (emeritus)

Assistant Professor: Carsten T. Vala


Political science is the systematic study of government and politics. It deals with the making and implementing of public policy by means of decisions regarded as authoritative or binding for society.

Although lines of intradisciplinary specialization are not rigidly fixed, the principal subfields include political theory, American government and politics, comparative government and politics, and international relations. Within those subfields are more specialized areas of study such as political behavior and public opinion, political parties and interest groups, legislative process, the executive and public administration, public law and judicial behavior, and state and local government. There are also courses regarded as topical and courses dealing with methods used in the discipline.

LEARNING AIMS

  • Students demonstrate evidence-based argumentation. In writing, students make assertions, judgments, and claims using evidence. Students provide proof to support written judgments and claims; writing is not merely reflective or rhetorically persuasive. Evidence takes the form of reference to a body of research findings; reference to a legal case or set of cases; or reference to the pattern or logic of a foundational text.
  • Students demonstrate the ability to apply concepts from a theoretical text or argument to a tangible political dilemma, proposal, or event. Student achievement is the ability to apply an abstract political concept to political decisions in the past, present, or future. Examples include party identification, search and seizure, and political ideology.
  • Students demonstrate an in-depth, critical understanding of American political institutions and processes.
  • Students demonstrate an in-depth, critical understanding of foundational ancient and modern Western texts on the formation of the state and the political community.
  • Students demonstrate an in-depth, critical understanding of at least one non-Western political text, perspective, or system.

MAJOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE

Bachelor of Arts

Requirements for a major and an example of a typical program of courses are as follows:

Freshman Year

Fall Term

    PL201 Foundations of Philosophy
    PS101 Politics* or
    PS102 American Politics*
    WR100 Effective Writing
    Language Core
    Math/Science Core

Spring Term

    HS101 Europe and the World Since 1500
    PL200-Level Philosophical Perspectives Course
    PS101 Politics* or
    PS102 American Politics*
    Language Core or
    Elective
    Nondepartmental Elective

Sophomore Year

Fall Term

    EN101 Understanding Literature
    TH201 Introduction to Theology or
    Elective
    History Core
    Math/Science Core
    Political Science Elective*

Spring Term

    English Core
    Fine Arts Core
    Math/Science Core
    Theology Core or
    Nondepartmental Elective
    Political Science Elective*

Junior Year

Fall Term

    TH201 Introduction to Theology or
    Elective
    Political Science Elective*
    Political Science Elective*
    Political Science Elective*
    Elective

Spring Term

    Theology Core or
    Nondepartmental Elective
    Political Science Elective*
    Political Science Elective*
    Nondepartmental Elective
    Elective

Senior Year

Fall Term

    Ethics Core
    Political Science Elective*
    Political Science Elective*
    Elective
    Elective

Spring Term

    Political Science Elective*
    Political Science Elective*
    Elective
    Elective
    Elective

* Required for major.

  1. PS101, PS102, and any eleven PS300- or 400-level courses are required for the major.
  2. Majors are advised, but not required, to take at least one upper-level course in each of the four main subfields of the discipline: political theory, American politics, comparative politics, and international relations.
  3. Majors are advised, but not required, to take CS111 as one of the three course mathematics/science requirement.
  4. Students are encouraged to study abroad, and the department is flexible in its acceptance of courses from foreign schools.
  5. Students majoring in global studies may pursue a double major with political science; however, no more than two political science courses may be counted toward the requirements for both majors. Similarly, global studies majors may pursue a minor in political science, though no more than two political science courses may count toward both the major and the minor. Since political science is already a basic component of the global studies major, political science-global studies interdisciplinary majors are not permitted.
  6. Ordinarily, the Department of Political Science does not offer an interdisciplinary major unless there is a compelling reason why a particular interdisciplinary major would truly create a positive and meaningful academic package not available through a traditional major, or a major and a minor. In order for the department to consider a request for an interdisciplinary major incorporating political science, a student must submit a written proposal outlining the courses that the student intends to take in both halves of the major and explaining how they will lead to an integrated and cohesive academic outcome. The student must demonstrate that the proposed interdisciplinary major is superior to adding a political science minor to a major from another department. Approval is at the discretion of the department chair. For an approved interdisciplinary major, the political science component consists of PS101, PS102, and six relevant upper-level PS courses.
  7. Students must complete the diversity core requirement through a designated diversity core, major, or elective course (see Diversity Core Requirement under Curriculum and Policies).

MINOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE

  • PS101 Politics
  • PS102 American Politics
  • Five Upper-Level PS Courses

INDEPENDENT STUDY

The department sponsors independent study projects. The burden for developing a project rests with the student--in consultation with a member of the faculty whose interests include the prospective area of concentration. Assigned readings, conferences on a regular basis, and a substantial paper are standard requirements.

INTERNSHIPS

The department sponsors internships related to national, state, and local government and politics in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. Although students are encouraged to consult with the department's internship coordinator and to avail themselves of the resources of Loyola's Career Center, the burden of applying for and securing an internship rests with the student. Examples of such internship opportunities might include the United States Congress; the White House and the executive branch; state and local legislative and executive branch offices; interest groups and public advocacy organizations; research groups and think tanks; media organizations; political campaigns; and various legal and judicial offices (individual attorneys, judges, courts, public defenders, etc.).

The internship's "on-site" component is integrated with appropriate academic assignments including assigned readings, a weekly journal of experience and reflection, frequent contacts with the departmentís internship coordinator, occasional class meetings, and a research paper due at the end of the semester. Approval of the department is required. Students with a cumulative grade point average below 3.000 generally are not recommended for internships. Only one internship can be counted toward fulfillment of the major.

© Loyola University Maryland. All rights reserved. Send comments or questions to the catalogues webmaster.