2013 - 2014
Graduate Catalogue

Academic Regulations and Policies


As a Jesuit, Catholic university, integrity and honesty are integral components of Loyolaís core values. This commitment to integrity and honesty is manifested in an atmosphere of open, civil discourse and careful, respectful listening where freedom of thought and expression are valued and protected. The University also supports honesty and integrity by striving in various ways to foster respect for oneself and oneís own work, as well as respect for others, their work, and their basic human rights.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

Loyola University Maryland is dedicated not only to learning and the advancement of knowledge, but also to the development of ethically sensitive, socially responsible persons. The University seeks to accomplish these goals through a sound educational program and encourages maturity, independence, and appropriate conduct among students and faculty within the University community. Students are responsible for civil classroom behavior as communicated by their course instructor, including in class use of technology. It is the responsibility of faculty and students alike to maintain the academic integrity of the University in all respects.

Faculty members are responsible for presenting syllabi with information about all coursework, including projects, examinations, and other assignments. At the first class meeting, faculty members should remind students of the standards of behavior and conduct to which students are expected to adhere.

Students at Loyola are citizens of an academic community that conducts itself according to an academic code of honor, following the Jesuit ideals of cura personalis and keeping within the school motto, "Strong Truths Well Lived." All students of the Loyola community have been equally entrusted by their peers to conduct themselves honestly on all academic assignments. The Universityís goal is to foster a trusting atmosphere that is ideal for learning. In order to achieve this goal, every student must be actively committed to this pursuit and its responsibilities. Thus, all students have the right, as well as the duty, to expect honest work from their colleagues. From this, students will benefit and learn from the caring relationships that the Loyola community trustfully embodies.

All registered students of Loyola University Maryland are bound to uphold the principles of academic integrity, and students are expected to understand the meaning and standards of academic integrity. Violations of academic integrity at Loyola include, but are not limited to, the following offenses as defined below: cheating, stealing, lying, forgery, and plagiarism. Ignorance of any of these offenses is not a valid reason for committing an act of academic dishonesty.

Cheating: The use of unauthorized assistance or material or the giving of unauthorized assistance or material in the carrying out of an academic assignment. An academic assignment includes all homework and projects assigned by the instructor. Students will also be expected to follow the rules set by a course instructor as presented on a written syllabus. The submission of papers or other assignments produced by another individual or furnished by a service (whether a fee is paid or not and whether the student utilizes some or all of the paper or other assignments) is a violation of the Academic Integrity Policy.

Faculty members should be explicit as to what is appropriate and inappropriate assistance on academic assignments. This guidance should make it clear to students what the faculty member allows with regard to proofreading, editing, etc. Ordinarily, consultation with faculty, library staff, tutors, and the like is appropriate unless the instructor has imposed stricter limits on the assignment or the course. For assignments involving multiple students, such as team projects, faculty should provide explicit guidance regarding their expectation with regard to collaboration and expectation on all aspects of the assignment.

Stealing: To take or appropriate anotherís property, ideas, etc., (related to an academic matter) without permission.

Lying: A false statement or representation (in an academic matter) made with the conscious intent to mislead others. The falsification may be verbal or in another form, as in the case of falsification of data.

Forgery: The intent to mislead others by falsifying a signature in an academic matter (Course Registration form, Change of Registration form, etc.).

Plagiarism: "The act of appropriating the literary composition of another, or parts, or passages of anotherís writing, of the ideas, or the language of the same, and passing them off as the product of oneís own mind" (Blackís Law Dictionary, 5th Edition). Students are expected to cite properly any material from a published or unpublished source, including material available on the Internet. Although academic disciplines may differ in the manner in which sources are cited, some principles apply across disciplines. In general, any ideas, words, or phrases that appear in another source must be acknowledged at the point at which they are utilized in a studentís work. Some program handbooks and course syllabi provide additional information or requirements.

Duplicate Submission: The submission of work (in whole or in part) that has been submitted in a prior or concurrent class without advance consent of the professor(s) assigning the work.

If the instructor believes that a student has committed a violation of academic integrity, the instructor shall meet with the student to review the evidence and the facts of the case. Whenever possible, this meeting should occur within 10 working days after the instructor becomes aware of a possible violation. The instructor considers any information provided by the student and determines whether a violation has occurred. If the instructor determines that a violation has occurred, the instructor determines the sanction and informs the student in writing of the decision and penalty, as appropriate. Normally, this notification occurs no later than 10 working days after the instructor meets with the student. The range of sanctions available for academic dishonesty includes resubmission of the assignment, a lower grade on the assignment, failure on the assignment, failure in the course, suspension, or dismissal from the program. If the course grade is F, then the student is automatically dismissed from the program.

If the student does not accept the decision of the instructor, the student asks the instructor, in writing, to prepare a written charge with the essential facts (the "Charge") for the department chair. For students enrolled in the liberal studies or MBA programs, the instructor prepares the Charge for the appropriate academic program director. For students in all other programs, the instructor prepares the Charge for the appropriate department chair. The student must make this request no later than 10 working days after being informed of the instructor's decision. The instructor must submit the Charge to the chair or director, with a copy to the student, no later than 10 working days of receiving the request. The Charge should contain all relevant information pertaining to the case. Within 10 working days of receiving a copy of the Charge, the student may submit relevant information, in writing, to the chair or director.

Within 10 working days of receiving the Charge, the chair or director contacts the chair of the Graduate Academic Standards Committee, who appoints a three-person Review Panel selected from members of the Committee. The Panel reviews files related to the case and meets with the student, chair or academic program director, and others whom the Panel deems to have relevant information. Third parties (such as lawyers, advisors, and family members) are not permitted to attend Panel meetings, which are audio recorded. Once the Panel has made a decision regarding whether or not a violation of academic integrity occurred, it will communicate that decision to the chair or director no later than 10 business days after the Panelís last meeting.

If the Panel finds that a violation of academic integrity did occur, then the appropriate sanction(s) will be determined. If the student feels the academic sanction(s) is (are) disproportionate to the academic integrity offense, the student may appeal the sanction(s) through the process outlined below (see Process of Appeal for Academic Sanctions). Appeals of academic sanctions should be submitted only upon resolution of any appeal of the Panelís decisions.

If the Panel finds that a violation of academic integrity did not occur, the instructor is encouraged to follow the decision of the Panel and to impose no sanction on the student. The instructor will inform the Graduate Academic Standards Committee and the student, in writing, whether or not an academic sanction will be imposed (and what that sanction will be) no later than 48 hours of receiving notification from the Panel of the outcome of the hearing.

If an instructor remains convinced that an academic integrity violation occurred, despite the decision of the Panel, the instructor may persist in imposing the academic sanction originally proposed in the Charge. If an instructor imposes an academic sanction and the Panel has determined that no academic integrity violation has occurred, the student can appeal the instructorís action according to the procedures outlined below (see Process of Appeal for Academic Sanctions).

If the Panel recommends dismissal, the chair or director makes a decision and informs the student in writing; this notification should occur no later than 10 business days after the chair or director receives the Panelís recommendation. If the student is dismissed from the program, the student may appeal to the appropriate academic Dean on procedural grounds only.

If a student brings evidence or expresses concern about the academic integrity of a fellow student to the instructor, the instructor meets with the reporting student to determine if there is sufficient evidence to explore the matter further. If the instructor, after examining the evidence and speaking with the appropriate parties, determines that a violation has likely occurred, then the instructor follows the steps above.

If a student brings evidence or expresses concern to the chair or director about the academic integrity of a fellow student in a particular course, the chair or director meets with the reporting student to determine if there is sufficient evidence to explore the matter further. If there seems to be such evidence, the chair or director meets with the appropriate instructor. If the instructor determines there is sufficient information for further investigation, then the instructor follows the steps above.

If a student brings evidence or expresses concern to the chair or director about the academic integrity of a fellow student beyond a particular course, such as comprehensive examinations, the chair or director meets with the reporting student to determine if there is sufficient evidence to explore the matter further. If there seems to be such evidence and the chair or director is not the director of the studentís particular program, the chair or director meets with that academic program director. If the director determines there is sufficient information for further investigation, then the director follows the steps above, taking the place of the instructor.

At the discretion of the chair or the director, the above timeline may be extended.

Process of Appeal for Academic Sanctions

Appeals of academic sanctions should be submitted only upon resolution of any appeal of Review Panel decisions.

If the Panel has found that a student did commit a violation of the academic integrity policy, the student can appeal the academic sanction imposed by the Panel on the following grounds:

  1. The academic sanction imposed is not the sanction listed in the Charge prepared by the instructor.
  2. The academic sanction imposed does not conform to any stated academic integrity violation policy on the course syllabus, or the sanction imposed does not conform to any departmental academic integrity violation policy on file with the appropriate dean.

The appeal must be submitted in writing and received by the appropriate Dean no later than four (4) business days from the receipt of the notification from the instructor about the academic sanction to be imposed. (The appropriate Dean is the Dean of the school of the University in which the course of the contested grade is housed.) The written appeal must clearly state the grounds for the appeal. The Dean will review appeals for appropriate submittal (i.e., the appeal is timely and specifies the grounds for the appeal). Appeals rejected as untimely may not be resubmitted.

If the appeal is appropriately submitted, the Dean will consider whether the academic sanction imposed by the instructor conforms to information contained in items 1 and 2 above. If the sanction does conform to those instruments, the Dean will uphold the sanction. If the sanction does not conform to those instruments, the Dean will make the appropriate adjustments, including changing the final grade if deemed appropriate.

In general, the Dean will make a decision no later than 20 business days from receipt of an appropriately submitted appeal. The Dean will communicate the decision, in writing, to the faculty member and the student, including the reasons for the decision. The decision of the Dean is final. There is no further appeal by either the faculty member or the student.

If the Panel has found that a student did not violate the academic integrity policy, the Panel chair will notify, in writing, the student, the faculty member, and the appropriate Dean within 48 hours after the finding. The instructor will inform the Panel and the student, in writing, whether an academic sanction will be imposed (and what that sanction will be) no later than 48 hours of receiving notification from the Panel of the outcome of the hearing.

If the faculty member in question continues to impose an academic sanction, the student may appeal this action to the appropriate academic Dean. The appeal must be submitted in writing to the appropriate Dean no later than four (4) business days from the receipt of the notification from the instructor that the instructor intends to impose an academic sanction. (The appropriate Dean is the Dean of the school of the University in which the course of the contested grade is housed.) The written appeal must include a copy of the notification from the Panel indicating that it did not find that the student violated the academic integrity policy and a copy of the notification from the instructor that the instructor intends to impose an academic sanction. Appeals that do not include this documentation will be rejected as incomplete and may not be resubmitted. Appeals rejected as untimely may not be resubmitted.

If an appeal is properly submitted, the Dean will consider the case on its merits after consulting appropriate materials and persons related to the Review Panel proceedings. The Dean should confer with the student and the instructor, individually, and may confer with additional appropriate persons related to the hearing. Other parties, including parents or attorneys, are not permitted to attend these conferences. Ordinarily, the Dean will communicate the decision to the student, the faculty member, and the Graduate Academic Standards Committee no later than 20 business days after receipt of the student's appeal. This notification must include a brief rationale for the finding. If the Dean determines that an academic integrity offense occurred, the Dean will uphold the original academic sanction. If the Dean determines that an academic integrity offense did not occur, no academic sanction may be imposed, and the Dean will make the appropriate adjustments, including changing the final grade if appropriate. The decision of the Dean is final. There is no further appeal for either the faculty member or the student.

STANDARDS OF CONDUCT

As a Catholic university in the Jesuit tradition, Loyola strives to nurture the formation of "men and women for others" and to provide an atmosphere of cura personalis, care for the whole person, so that each individual can realize his or her full potential. All members of the Loyola community have the right to be treated with courtesy and respect. In this spirit, Loyola espouses the highest ethical standards and expects students, faculty, administrators, and staff to conduct themselves in a manner that upholds these principles. There are several general areas in which these Standards of Conduct apply: official University-wide policies, legal regulations, specialized professional codes of ethics, and generally acceptable standards of personal conduct.

Loyola University Maryland places in highest regard the establishment and maintenance of a campus environment of interpersonal care and personal responsibility. Only when such a community exists can the University fulfill its goal to ensure the intellectual, ethical, social, and spiritual development and growth of its students. Honesty, integrity, and taking responsibility for the welfare of self and others are characteristics of such a community. Loyola, therefore, sets high expectations of its students, as well as members of its faculty, administration, and staff, for conduct that supports the maintenance of a caring community. Students are expected to conduct themselves in such a manner as to ensure the health and welfare of all members of the Loyola community.

To these ends, students are expected to conform to all policies and regulations of the University. These include officially adopted policies such as the Harassment and Discrimination Policy and Procedures, Employee Grievance Policy and Hearings Procedures, Policy on Consensual Relationships, Loyola University Maryland Alcohol Policies and Procedures, and Ethical Use of Technology Policy, as well as policies on academic integrity and regulations concerning parking and the use of the Loyola-Notre Dame Library. Copies of these documents are accessible online, www.loyola.edu/department/gradservices.aspx. Many of these policies specify procedures for handling alleged violations.

Some graduate programs require students to participate in an international field study or other study abroad experience. When involved in international programs, students should remember that each country has distinct laws, regulations, and acceptable standards of conduct. Loyolaís graduate students, as representatives of the University, are expected to abide by local standards for conduct, dress, speech, and social behavior. Graduate students should not violate local standards or laws, and should not engage in behaviors that damage the reputation of international study programs or Loyola University Maryland.

Students must abide by federal, state, and local laws. A student who is accused of a crime may be required by the appropriate Dean to take a leave of absence until the matter is resolved. Upon resolution of the matter by federal, state, or local authorities, the appropriate Dean will forward the case to the appropriate body for determination of the studentís status, which may include dismissal from the University.

Graduate programs that have as their mission training students for a service profession include professional comportment as a requirement for students, in addition to academic performance and integrity. These departments have a process that allows for assessment of professional behavior and recommendation of remedial interventions. Such remedial recommendations or requirements may include personal counseling, additional supervision, additional coursework, or other assignments deemed useful for professional development. On occasion, students are unable to meet standards following remedial efforts or refuse to accept recommendations for remediation. In these cases, the departmental committee may recommend dismissal from the program. In addition, if the departmental committee finds substantial evidence of personal or professional difficulties, the Committee may recommend suspension (during which time the student may not take academic courses, clinical placement, or research work, or be in any other way connected with the University) with a required program of remediation or dismissal from the program. The student may appeal to the Graduate Academic Standards Committee. The student must file the appeal within five working days of receiving the decision of the department. The only grounds for appeal are procedural. The Graduate Academic Standard's Committee's decision is final.

Any member of the Loyola community who observes a violation of the standards of conduct for graduate students should bring it to the attention of the appropriate Dean, or his or her designee. Upon receiving information about a possible violation, the Dean, or his or her designee, investigates whether there is sufficient evidence to explore the matter further. If there seems to be such evidence, the Dean, or his or her designee, notifies the student in writing of the alleged misconduct. The student may submit written information related to the allegation to the Dean, or his or her designee, and may also request a meeting with the Dean, or his or her designee. If the Dean, or his or her designee, determines that a violation of the standards of conduct for graduate students has likely occurred, the Dean, or his or her designee, forwards the file to the appropriate body for further consideration. For alleged violations of University-wide policies, such as harassment, the Dean, or his or her designee, follows the procedures as specified in the particular policy document. If the allegation concerns misconduct related to clinical work, the Dean, or his or her designee, refers the matter to the appropriate department chair who follows the procedures set forth in the appropriate program handbook. In all other cases, the Dean, or his or her designee, refers the matter to the University Judicial Process.

If the matter is referred to the University Judicial Process, then Vice President for Student Development, or his or her designee, appoints an Administrative Panel, drawn from faculty and administrators. The Panel hears the case, according to established procedures, and makes a decision about responsibility. If the student is found responsible, the Panel also determines the sanction. The Panel sends a written copy of the decision and sanction, if any, to the student. If the student is found responsible, the student may appeal to the University Board on Discipline. The student must file the appeal within five working days of receiving the Administrative Panelís decision. The only grounds for appeal are procedural. The appeal is heard by a Review Panel, drawn from members of the University Board on Discipline. The Review Panel hears the case and informs the student in writing of its decision. The Review Panelís decision is final.

Warnings, suspensions, and dismissals are possible penalties for violations of University regulations and standards of personal conduct. Suspension and dismissal are normally the only actions that are recorded on the student's permanent record.

SEPARATION FROM THE UNIVERSITY

A student may be separated from the University if it is determined that the student engages in, threatens to engage in, or is likely to engage in behavior that poses a danger to self or others; behavior that directly and substantially interferes with the lawful activities of others; behavior that results in the studentís inability to pursue academic work; or if the student refuses to cooperate with efforts necessary to determine whether the student's behavior falls within one or more of the above criteria.

BUCKLEY AMENDMENT

Loyola University Maryland has a commitment to protect the confidentiality of student records. The University makes every effort to release information only to those individuals who have established a legitimate educational need for the information. Documents submitted to the University by the student or other authorized person or agency for the purpose of admission to the University become the property of Loyola University Maryland and cannot be released (originals or copies) to another party by request.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. These rights include:

  1. The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days of the day the University receives a request for access. Students should submit to the registrar, dean, head of the academic department, or other appropriate official, written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The University official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the University official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.
  2. The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the student believes is inaccurate. Students may ask the University to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate. They should write the University official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate. If the University decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the University will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.
  3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.
  4. One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks.

    A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility.

    If nondirectory information is needed to address a disaster or other health or safety emergency, school officials may disclose that information to appropriate parties, without consent, if the University determines that knowledge of that information is necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or other individuals.

  5. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by Loyola University Maryland to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is:
  6. Family Policy Compliance Office
    U.S. Department of Education
    400 Maryland Avenue, SW
    Washington, DC 20202-4605

FERPA requires that Loyola University Maryland, with certain exceptions, obtain the student's written consent prior to the disclosure of personally identifiable information from the student's education records. However, the University may disclose appropriately designated directory information without written consent, unless the student has advised the University to the contrary in accordance with University procedures. The primary purpose of directory information is to allow the University to include this type of information from the student's education records in certain institutional publications. Examples include the annual yearbook, Dean's List or other recognition lists, graduation programs; and directory information. Directory information is information that is generally not considered harmful or an invasion of privacy if released, can also be disclosed to outside organizations without a student's prior written consent. Outside organizations include, but are not limited to, companies that manufacture class rings or publish yearbooks.

Loyola University Maryland considers the following information to be directory information which can be released without the written consent of the student: name; photo; home, dorm, local, and e-mail address; home, dorm, local phone number; voice mailbox; class year; enrollment status; participation in officially recognized activities and sports; and weight and height of members of athletic teams. Every student has the right to file a written request with the University (Records Office) to restrict the listing of directory information in the electronic address directory. If a student does not want the University to disclose directory information from the student's education records without the student's prior written consent, the student must notify the University annually, in writing, within the first week of classes: Records Office, 4501 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21210-2699. Students should be aware that instructing the University not to release directory information could impact disclosures to potential employers, lending institutions, health insurance carriers, etc.

The University may disclose educational records to the parents of a dependent student, as defined in Title 26 USCSS 152 of the Internal Revenue Code. Proof of dependency must be on record with the University or provided to the office responsible for maintaining records prior to disclosure of the records. Students may also sign an Authorization to Disclose Education Records to Parents, available in the Records Office (Maryland Hall 141) and online, www.catalogue.loyola.edu/records.

BACKGROUND CHECKS

Background checks may be required for participation in some programs. Where applicable, further information can be found in the program description within the department chapter of this catalogue.

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS

Degree Students

Applicants who meet the entrance standards of the program for which they are applying are usually admitted as degree candidates; however, students with provisional or probationary status have certain administrative conditions attached to their acceptances. All specified requirements must be met before final acceptance as a degree candidate is granted. Students with provisional or probationary status who do not comply with the conditions of their acceptance will not be permitted to register for subsequent terms.

Non-degree Students

Visiting Students

Graduate students who take courses at the University which count toward a graduate degree at another institution are visiting students. These students must submit an authorization letter from the dean of the degree-granting institution indicating that the student is in good academic standing and outlining the specific courses to be taken at Loyola. Visiting students in the Sellinger School of Business and Management must meet the same admission and prerequisite requirements as degree-seeking students. Visiting students are ineligible for a degree from Loyola University Maryland.

Visiting students must submit an application along with the authorization letter. The usual tuition, special course fees, and a $25 registration fee are charged each semester. Visiting students are ineligible for financial aid from Loyola University Maryland.

Special Students

Special students are those who have at least a bachelor's degree and wish to enroll in graduate courses without pursuing a graduate degree or certificate at Loyola. To become a special student, an individual must submit an application, application fee, transcripts which verify receipt of the college/graduate degrees, and if applicable, meet departmental graduate admission standards. Not all programs offer the special student option. Applicants must check with their program of interest to ensure that they are eligible to be considered.

Postbaccalaureate Students

Postbaccalaureate students are those who have a bachelor's degree and wish to enroll in graduate or undergraduate foundation courses without pursuing a graduate degree at Loyola. Admission requirements for postbaccalaureate status can be found under Admission.

Postmaster's Students

Individuals with a master's degree may be admitted to Loyola College for the Certificate of Advanced Study (C.A.S.), a 30-credit minimum program beyond a master's degree in the area or related areas in which the master's degree was received. C.A.S. programs are offered in pastoral counseling and psychology.

Individuals with a master's degree may be admitted to the School of Education for the Certificate of Advanced Study (C.A.S.) in Education, a 30-credit minimum program beyond a master's degree in the area or related areas in which the master's degree was received. C.A.S. programs are offered in educational leadership, curriculum and instruction, literacy, Montessori education, school counseling, and special education.

Individuals with a qualifying master's degree from Loyola or another accredited institution may take specific courses in pastoral counseling, psychology, or school counseling in order to fulfill prelicensure requirements or to prepare for examination leading to the Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor (LCPC) credential offered by the Maryland Board of Examiners of Professional Counselors.

Individuals with a master's degree qualify for admission to liberal studies and computer science as nonmatriculating students. Individuals with a master's degree in business from Loyola or an AACSB-accredited school may take individual courses under the Master's Plus Program, which do not lead to a degree.

Continuing Professional Education Students

Individuals who do not intend to pursue a graduate degree may take individual courses in education. An undergraduate degree from an accredited institution is required along with program specific application materials.

STUDENT STATUS

A full-time student registers for at least nine credits during the fall semester, nine credits during the spring semester, and six credits during the summer sessions. Since instructors' assignments presume an average of 18 hours of study per course week in fall and spring and 24 in the summer, full-time students normally should not be employed for more than 16 hours a week.

Half-time students register for six credits during the fall semester, six credits during the spring semester, and three credits during the summer sessions.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

Requirements for Admission

In addition to the specific program application forms for all graduate programs (see Admission chapter under Application Materials), international students are required to submit the following additional documentation:

  • All applicants who are not native English speakers or who have not completed a degree program taught in English, must demonstrate proficiency in the English language. International applicants are required to submit the results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Loyola accepts the paper, computer adaptive, and internet-based testing versions. Official TOEFL score reports cannot be more than two years old; Loyolaís institution code is 5370. For additional information, visit the Educational Testing Service website, www.ets.org/toefl.
  • Official transcripts are required for all graduate programs. Applicants who hold degrees or have earned credits from non-U.S. institutions must have a course-by-course evaluation of their academic records done by a recognized evaluation services agency before they can be considered for admission to a degree program. Loyola recommends World Education Services, Inc. (www.wes.org).
  • An International Student Supplemental Application must be submitted with the application materials. To obtain the application, visit www.loyola.edu/graduate/international-students.aspx .

Obtaining the Form I-20

Loyola University Maryland is authorized under federal law to enroll nonimmigrant students who are citizens of countries other than the United States. International applicants to Loyolaís graduate programs who need an F-1 student visa are required to submit supplemental documentation in addition to the academic credentials necessary for admission committee review. The following documents are required and all must be adequately completed and received before a Form I-20 can be issued:

  • Personal statement or statement from benefactor affirming that all expenses will be met during the studentís period of enrollment at Loyola. Expenses include tuition, fees, books, housing, medical, and all other expenses.
  • Declaration of Finances Form must be accompanied by a current, original bank statement (in U.S. dollars) verifying that the funds are available to support the student's stay at Loyola. To obtain the form, visit www.loyola.edu/graduate/international-students.aspx .
  • Copy of passport (biographical page).
  • Submit proof of health insurance coverage for the first year of study at Loyola (must be renewed each academic year). Coverage must be equivalent to the Aetna Student Health Insurance Plan designed for Loyola students (www.aetnastudenthealth.com), and it must be transferable to the United States. Students are encouraged to purchase the Aetna plan.
  • Tuition payment for the first nine credits. (Note: ELMBA students should contact International Student Services for the required amount of tuition payment.)
  • The $25 registration fee.

Applicants must apply as full-time, degree-seeking students. In order to maintain F-1 nonimmigrant student status, accepted applicants must take and successfully maintain nine or more semester hours of graduate work each fall and spring semester. Students must complete the courses with a grade of B (3.000) or better in order to remain in good standing at Loyola, which is necessary to maintain the F-1 nonimmigrant student status.

Once all required documents are received, the information is reviewed and, if approved, Loyola will issue a Form I-20 to the student.

Obtaining the F-1 Student Visa

Students must schedule an appointment for an F-1 student visa interview with the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in their home country. Since visa procedures may differ from one embassy or consulate to another, students should check for specific requirements prior to their interview. To obtain detailed information on the embassy or consulate in your area, visit the Department of State website, travel.state.gov. The consular officer interviews the student and decides whether or not to issue the visa based on the interview, validity of the passport, and the other required documents presented during the interview.

At least three business days prior to their visa interview at the U.S. Embassy or Consulate, students must pay a $200 USD SEVIS fee directly to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Students must present a receipt of this payment at the time of application for the F-1 student visa, as well as the U.S. port-of-entry. Canadian students must pay the fee and have the SEVIS fee receipt of payment prior to arrival at the U.S. port-of-entry.

Entering the United States

Students may not enter the United States more than 30 days prior to the report date on their Form I-20. Upon arrival to a U.S. port-of-entry, a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Officer will examine the student's Form I-20, SEVIS fee receipt, visa, and passport and issue a Form I-94 card. Entry into the United States is recorded by CBP.

Maintaining Legal F-1 Status

Within ten (10) days of arrival at the University, international students are required to meet with the international student advisor in the Office of International Programs and present their immigration documents. Copies of the studentís passport, Form I-20, SEVIS fee receipt, and Form I-94 card will be made and processed. To schedule an appointment, call 410-617-5245.

Continuing students are required to check-in with the international student advisor within the first ten (10) days of each semester. The Office of International Programs verifies information in the U.S. SEVIS immigration system and makes updates accordingly. Students must be validated through SEVIS registration every semester they are enrolled at Loyola.

Students must report any change of address or contact information to the international student advisor within ten (10) days of change. This information will then be reported to SEVIS. Students must also notify the Records Office to have their contact information updated in the Universityís database.

In order to maintain legal F-1 student status, students must take and successfully maintain a minimum of nine (9) credits of graduate coursework each fall and spring semester. Students must also remain in good academic standing to maintain their F-1 status.

GRADES

A student's performance in a course will be reported by the instructor in accordance with the following grading system:

AExcellent. Denotes high achievement and indicates intellectual initiative beyond the objectives of the course. 
BGood. Denotes work which meets course objectives and the intellectual command expected of a graduate student. 
CUnsatisfactory. Denotes work of inferior quality compared to the objectives of the course. It is the lowest passing grade (see Academic Dismissal). 
FFailure. (see Academic Dismissal
IIncomplete. (see Incomplete Grade
PPass. Denotes satisfactory work, a B (3.000) or better, in an ungraded course. 
SSatisfactory. Denotes satisfactory work, equivalent to a C (2.000) or better for a course taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. This grade means that course credits will be added to the student's credit total, but this grade has no effect on the student's QPA. 
UUnsatisfactory. Denotes unsatisfactory work, equivalent to a C- (1.670) or below, in a course taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. This grade means that course credits have no effect on the student's credit total or QPA. 
WWithdrawal. Denotes authorized departure from course without completion. It does not enter into grade point average calculation. 
NGNo Grade. Denotes grade to be submitted later or a course for which no credit or grade is given. 
NRNot Received. Denotes that the grade has not been submitted by the instructor. 
GLGrade Later. Denotes the first semester is completed in a two semester course for which a full-year grade is issued. 
LListener. (see Audit Policy
AWDenotes lack of attendance or completion of course requirements for students registered as a listener (audit). 

Additional suffixes of (+) and (-) may be attached to passing grades to more sharply define the academic achievement of a student. In calculating a student's quality point average (QPA) on a per credit basis, A = 4.000; A- = 3.670; B+ = 3.330; B = 3.000; B- = 2.670; C+ = 2.330; C = 2.000; and F = 0.000. The QPA is computed by multiplying the grade points for each course times the number of credits for that course, summing these points and dividing by total credits taken. Under no circumstances will a student be permitted to graduate unless the QPA is 3.000 or higher. Honors are not awarded in graduate programs.

Courses considered in calculating the QPA are those taken at Loyola after admission into the program. Courses for which advanced standing or waivers were given are not included. Students may not retake courses for credit. Some departments have additional grade restrictions listed under the Degree Requirements section of each department.

Grade Reports

Students can generate official grade reports online using WebAdvisor. Online access requires a valid User ID and Password (same as Loyola e-mail). No grades are given in person or over the telephone. Official grades will not be released for students with outstanding financial obligations to the University or those who have borrowed and not returned equipment or supplies such as library books and athletic equipment.

Incomplete Grade

At the discretion of the course instructor, a temporary grade of I (Incomplete) may be given to a student who is passing a course but for reasons beyond the student's control (illness, injury, or other nonacademic circumstance), is unable to complete the required coursework during the semester. A grade of I should not be issued to allow the student additional time to complete academic requirements of the course (except as noted above), repeat the course, complete extra work, or because of excessive absenteeism or the student's unexcused absence from the final exam.

Arrangements for the grade of I must be made prior to the final examination, or if the course has no final examination, prior to the last class meeting. The responsibility for completing all coursework within the agreed upon time rests with the student.

If the completion date is more than two weeks after the end of the semester, the appropriate Dean's signature will be required. The grade of I may remain on the record no longer than the time period agreed to by the instructor and the student and may not exceed one semester. If the I is not resolved satisfactorily within the agreed upon time period, a grade of F (0.000) will be recorded by the Records Office as the final grade. Students may not graduate with a grade of I in any course on their record.

Appeal of a Final Grade

For any grade change or grade appeal related in whole or in part to an alleged violation of the academic integrity policy, follow the policy stated under Academic Integrity above. For all other appeals of final course grades or changes of grade, follow the processes outlined below.

Any student who has reason to question the accuracy of a final course grade should request in writing a grade review with the instructor, stating the grounds upon which the review is being sought. The student must request a review of the grade no later than 10 business days after the beginning of the subsequent fall semester for summer courses or spring semester for fall courses, and no later than 10 business days after final grades are due for spring semester courses. The instructor reports to the student and department chair (or program director), in writing, the result of the grade review (whether the grade is changed or not), ordinarily no later than 10 business days after the receipt of the studentís request. The report must include an explanation of the reasoning behind the result. (If the instructor is the department chair or program director, the report is submitted to the appropriate Dean. The appropriate Dean is the Dean of the school of the University in which the course of the contested grade is housed.)

If a grade change is made by the instructor, the instructor states the reason for the grade change on the Change of Grade Form and submits the Change of Grade Form, along with a copy of the studentís written request, to the department chair or program director for approval. (In the case where the department chair is also the instructor, the instructor will submit the materials to the appropriate Dean who will appoint a senior member of the department to review the grade.)

In reviewing a grade change, if the chair or program director (or senior member) is satisfied that established procedures were followed and that the grade was not changed in an arbitrary or capricious manner or for inappropriate reasons, the chair or program director (or senior member) communicates this to the faculty member and the student in writing and submits the Change of Grade Form to the Records Office. If, however, the chair or program director (or senior member) is not satisfied that established procedures were followed, or believes the grade was changed in an arbitrary or capricious manner or for other inappropriate reasons, the chair or program director (or senior member) communicates this in writing to the faculty member and the student and no change of grade occurs. In the case where the chair or program director (or senior member) does not have confidence in the grade or adherence to the procedures, see the paragraph on considering a grade appeal below.

If the instructor does not change a grade, and the student is not satisfied with the instructorís grade review, the student may file a grade appeal. This student grade appeal must include an explanation of why the student thinks the result of the faculty review of the grade is in error. The grade appeal must be submitted in writing to the department chair no later than 10 business days after the instructor submits the written grade review to the student and department chair. (In the case where the department chair or program director is also the instructor, a senior member of the department or program chosen by the appropriate Dean will review the grade appeal.) No grades may be appealed after a student graduates.

In considering a grade appeal, the department chair or program director (or senior department member) should ensure that established procedures were followed and that the grade was not determined in an arbitrary or capricious manner or for inappropriate reasons. The chair or program director (or senior member) should confer with the student and instructor, individually. Other parties, including parents, spouses, or attorneys are not permitted to attend the grade appeal conference. The chair or program director (or senior member) should report the result of this review, in writing, to the instructor, the student, and the appropriate Dean, ordinarily no later than 10 business days after receiving the appeal. This report must include an explanation for the reasoning behind the decision. If the chair or program director (or senior member) determines that established procedures were not followed or that a grade was given in an arbitrary or capricious manner or based on inappropriate reasons, the chair or program director (or senior member) fills out a Change of Grade Form and submits it to the Records Office.

If either the student or instructor is not satisfied with the outcome of the department chairís or program directorís (or senior department memberís) review of a change of grade or of a grade appeal, the student and/or the instructor may appeal to the appropriate Dean by submitting all pertinent documents for further review. The Dean is expected to review the record and confer with the chair or program director (or senior member) and the student and instructor. Other parties, including parents, spouses, and attorneys, are not permitted to attend this conference. If the Dean is unavailable to adjudicate the appeal, the appropriate associate dean will do so on the Deanís behalf.

The Dean reports the outcome of the grade appeal review to the instructor, student, chair or program director, and Records Office, normally no later than 20 business days after the receipt of the information from the department chair or program director. The Deanís review of all grade changes and grade appeals is final.

If a dismissal involves a grade appeal, then both the appeal of the dismissal and the grade appeal must be filed no later than 30 days after the close of the semester. Students are allowed to remain enrolled in current courses while appealing grades that will result in dismissal; however, they will not be allowed to enroll for subsequent semesters until the appeal is resolved. Students already registered for the next semester will be removed from enrollment if, when the appeal is resolved, the dismissal stands. Students who have been academically dismissed and who are in the process of a grade appeal may not register for future semesters until the appeal is resolved. Students dismissed from an academic program may not reapply to the same program.

A W cannot be the result of a grade appeal. A W on an academic transcript indicates that a student has successfully withdrawn from a course(s), following the approved course withdrawal process (described below), including published deadlines.

Audit Policy

Audit status indicates that a student has registered as a listener for the course. Auditing students must meet the requirements for admission to a degree program. An auditing student must meet the same prerequisites and pay the same tuition and fees as a credit student, but attendance and completion of the course assignments are at the option of the student unless otherwise specified by the instructor. Students not completing the requirements stipulated by the instructor will be issued a grade of AW. Enrollment for audit in those courses in which auditing is permitted is on a space-available basis.

A student may change from audit to credit and from credit to audit until the third class of the semester, with permission of the instructor. After that date, change from audit to credit is not permitted. Once a student has audited a course, that course cannot be retaken for credit.

Withdrawals

A student may withdraw from a course no later than the date reflected in the academic calendar and receive a grade of W. Failure to comply with the official withdrawal procedure will result in a permanent grade of F (0.000).

To withdraw, a student must submit a Change of Registration Form to the Records Office or to the appropriate department office. A withdrawal from a graduate course is not official until the form has been properly approved and has the appropriate signatures. The student's permanent record will show a grade of W for a withdrawal. The record of any student who has received two or more W grades will be reviewed prior to the student's continuance in the program.

ACADEMIC STANDARDS AND DISMISSAL

It is the student's responsibility to make certain that the minimum QPA requirement of 3.000, which is a B average, is maintained. Students who fall below this level of achievement will be placed on academic probation for one semester. Failure to raise the cumulative QPA to 3.000 in the following semester will result in dismissal from the program. The receipt of one F (0.000) will result in dismissal from the program. In Loyola College and the School of Education, the accumulation of two grades of C+ (2.330) or lower will result in dismissal from the program. In the Sellinger School of Business and Management, the accumulation of three grades of C+ (2.330) or lower will result in dismissal from the program. Some departments and programs have additional and/or more stringent academic standards; these are listed in the relevant department or program section of this catalogue. As noted below, dismissal may also result from excessive withdrawals, academic dishonesty, or other unethical or unprofessional conduct reflecting upon a student's ability to enter into the academic or professional field in which the degree is being offered.

A student has the right to appeal an academic dismissal. A written request for appeal must be made within 30 working days after the notice of dismissal. Students enrolled in liberal studies or an MBA program appeal to the appropriate academic program director. Students in all other programs appeal to the appropriate department chair. Within 10 working days of receiving the studentís appeal, the chair or director contacts the chair of the appropriate appeal body. In Loyola College and the School of Education, the review is conducted by a three-person Review Panel selected from members of the Graduate Academic Standards Committee. In the Sellinger School of Business and Management, the review is conducted by the Admissions and Retention Committee. The appeal body reviews information submitted by the student and meets with student as well as others whom the Panel deems to have relevant information. Third parties (such as lawyers, advisors, and family members) are not permitted to attend these meetings, which are audio recorded. The appeal body informs the student of its decision in writing, with a copy to the chair or director, within 10 working days from the date of the appeal bodyís last meeting. The decision of the appeal body is final. At the discretion of the appropriate Dean, the above timeline may be extended. In cases where the academic dismissal is upheld, students may not reapply to the same program at a later date.

Federal financial aid is a separate appeal process, subject to the federal regulations governing the federal financial aid satisfactory academic progress policy found under Financial Aid.

TIME LIMIT

Every degree program has a time limit to completion. While continuous enrollment is not a requirement of all graduate programs, most part-time programs allow students the flexibility to pursue their degrees on a self-paced calendar based on the availability of courses. This is most true for part-time programs designed for working professionals. Those programs that operate in a cohort format, with a sequenced curriculum (mainly full-time and fast-tracked programs), do require continuous enrollment in order for students to complete the program in the designed timeframe.

If a student in a part-time program fails to register for a course for three consecutive terms (including summer), the student will be withdrawn from the program and must reapply for admission and pay a readmission fee. Readmission is not automatic; readmitted students are subject to any changes made in admission and degree requirements since the date of their first admission.

In Loyola College and the School of Education, a time limit of five years from the semester in which graduate courses are begun is normally allowed for the completion of coursework. Normally prerequisite courses do not count against the five-year limit. One additional year is permitted for completion of the thesis in areas where a thesis is a requirement. It is expected that a student will complete the thesis within two regular semesters after the one in which presentation is made in Thesis Seminar. Refer to the department for information regarding registration for Thesis Seminar, Thesis Guidance, or Thesis Guidance Continuation.

The Master of Arts (M.A.) in Emerging Media is designed to be completed in 12 months for full-time students and 44 months for part-time students.

The Pastoral Counseling Department permits students to complete the Master of Science (M.S.) with a total of 66 credits within seven years. Students pursuing the Master of Arts (M.A.) must complete a total of 45 credits within seven years. Doctoral students are allowed seven years to complete all academic, clinical, and research requirements, including successful completion of the dissertation.

The Psychology Department allows students six years to complete all degree requirements for the 48- or 60-credit M.S. program. The department allows students seven years to complete all of the requirements for the Psy.D. program, including the dissertation and internship. This necessitates that Psy.D. students apply for internship no later than the fall of their sixth academic year in the program.

The speech-language pathology program has an integrated, two-year schedule.

The Master of Theological Studies (M.T.S.) is designed to be completed in two years of full-time study. It is possible to complete the program on a part-time basis. Part-time students have six (6) years to complete all of the degree requirements.

The Executive MBA has a fixed, 2.5-year schedule. The Emerging Leaders MBA has a fixed, 12-month schedule, and the Accounting Certificate has a fixed, 11-week schedule. The Cyber Security Certificate is a part-time program consisting of five, three-credit courses offered over a 12-month period. The MBA evening programs require students to complete their degrees within seven years for the full 53-credit MBA; within six years for 38 credits; and within five years for 33 credits (core and electives only). The MSF program must be completed within five years of first enrollment in upper-level (700) courses. MBA and MSF students are expected to have completed 60 percent of their programs within the first four years.

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

A student requiring a leave of absence must make a request in writing to the department chair or program director and receive written permission for the leave of absence for a specified period of time. The terms under which the student returns are stated in the letter from the department chair or appropriate administrator. Students on an approved leave of absence are not permitted to engage in academic coursework (thesis, dissertation, etc.) and/or work with faculty during this period of separation.

In the Psychology Department, master's students should make this request in writing to the director of the master's program, and doctoral students should write to the director of clinical training. Students are allowed only one leave of absence during the course of their studies. If a student wants an additional leave of absence, that student must go through an appeals committee.

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Independent study courses are special courses that permit a student to study a subject or topic in considerable depth beyond the scope of a regular course. These are courses that are not ordinarily offered by a department or program and often are listed as "special topics" courses. The student works closely and directly with the instructor as a scholarly team. The format of the course may vary: laboratory research, prose or poetry writings, specialized study of a particular topic, etc. The student must expect to devote considerably more time to these courses than to a regular course. The student must use initiative, be highly motivated, and have a strong interest in the subject. Independent studies are not conducted as distance learning or as online courses and must include significant face-to-face time with the instructor on one of the Loyola campuses. Since the work is largely original on the part of the student, the instructor is only able to give a general direction and guidance to the work.

Registration for independent study courses requires submission of the Specialized Study Form no later than the end of the scheduled add/drop period. To gain approval for an independent study course, a student must:

  1. Develop a syllabus, which includes readings, assignments, scheduled meeting times, etc., with the instructor who will direct the independent study and obtain the instructor's signature on the completed Specialized Study Form.
  2. Present the syllabus to the department chair and obtain the chair's signature for approval of the course.

PRIVATE STUDY

Private study courses are regular courses (e.g., courses that appear in the catalogue and have numbers assigned to them with descriptive titles) that are not scheduled in a given semester and that the student has not been able to schedule in the regular sequence. Students are only allowed to enroll in courses as private study if they will be delayed in completing their program due to scheduling issues. The scope, assignments, and requirements for a private study course are the same as for the regular course, and the student is required to meet with the instructor on a regular basis. Private study courses are not conducted as distance learning or as online courses and must include significant face-to-face time with the instructor on one of the Loyola campuses.

Private study courses must be taken for a regular grade. Registration for these courses requires submission of the Specialized Study Form, signed by both the instructor and department chair, no later than the end of the scheduled add/drop period. To gain approval for a private study course, a student must:

  1. Develop a syllabus, which includes readings, assignments, scheduled meeting times, etc., with the instructor who will direct the independent study and obtain the instructor's signature on the completed Specialized Study Form.
  2. Present the syllabus to the department chair and obtain the chair's signature for approval of the course.

TEST MATERIALS

All examinations, tests, and quizzes assigned as a part of a course are the property of Loyola University Maryland. Students may review their graded examination, test, or quiz but may not retain possession unless permitted to do so by the instructor.

ADVANCED STANDING

Advanced standing toward a degree or certificate program may be granted for graduate courses which have been taken in other accredited graduate schools within five years of the date of admission to graduate study at Loyola. The maximum number of credits normally allowed for advanced standing is six (6). The student must have a grade of at least a B (3.000) in each course under consideration; however, only credits (not grades) are brought into Loyola. Once these courses are approved, they appear on the Loyola transcript.

In order to have courses considered for advanced standing, students must submit a written request for advanced standing and an official transcript must be submitted to the department chair or appropriate administrator as delegated at the time of admission. Advanced standing in the Sellinger School applies to upper-level courses (GB700-800) only. These courses are normally from AACSB-accredited institutions.

TRANSFER CREDIT

Loyola graduate students wishing to take courses at another accredited graduate school must obtain prior written approval from the department chair or appropriate program administrator.

School of Education

Only courses from accredited schools and programs will be considered for transfer credit. Mode of course delivery is not a consideration in transfer decisions. No more than six (6) credits from advanced standing and/or transfer will be accepted from another institution toward the Loyola degree. A grade of at least a B (3.000) must be received for each course transferred; however, only credits (not grades) are brought into Loyola. Once these courses are approved, they appear on the Loyola transcript. Under exceptional circumstances, and only with prior written approval of the associate dean, may courses be transferred in after beginning degree work.

Sellinger School of Business and Management (SSBM)

Only courses from another AACSB-accredited school will be considered for transfer credit. Mode of course delivery is not a consideration in transfer decisions. No more than six (6) credits from advanced standing and/or transfer will be accepted from another institution toward the Loyola degree. A grade of at least a B (3.000) must be received for each course transferred to Loyola. Under exceptional circumstances, and only with prior written approval of the assistant dean, may courses be transferred in after beginning degree work.

Upon acceptance to the MBA program, students who have completed an SSBM graduate certificate may, within three years of certificate completion, be granted up to 12 credits to be applied as appropriate electives within the degree. Students completing the Loyola M.B.A. or M.S.F. who wish to pursue a second Loyola graduate business program may be granted as many as 12 credits of appropriate SSBM coursework to be applied from one program to the other. Courses used as transfer credit from one Loyola business program to another must be at the 700-level or above.

TRANSCRIPTS

Student academic records are maintained in the Records Office. Academic records are available for student inspection, by appointment during office hours.

The transcript is a facsimile of the student's permanent academic record at Loyola. Only unofficial transcripts are given to the student. Unofficial transcripts are printed on security paper; however, they do not bear the University seal or the signature of the director of records. Official transcripts are transmitted or mailed directly to another college or university or other official institution or agency. Official transcripts are printed on security paper, and they bear the seal of the University and the signature of the director of records.

Transcripts are issued only upon the written request of the student concerned or the submission of an electronic request using WebAdvisor or Loyola's secure online transcript ordering service. Due to authentication restrictions, e-mail, fax, and telephone requests are not accepted. There is no charge for transcripts.

Transcripts should be requested well in advance of the date desired to allow for processing time and possible mail delay. The University will not assume responsibility for transcripts that are delayed, because they have not been requested in time or the student has an outstanding debt with the University. Transcripts will not be faxed; however, they can be delivered electronically through Loyola's online transcript ordering service.

Transcripts of work at other institutions or test scores submitted for admission or evaluation of credit cannot be copied or reissued by Loyola University Maryland. If that information is needed, the student must go directly to the issuing institution or agency.

GRADUATION

All academic requirements (including clinical), comprehensive exams, thesis (if required), and any additional requirements unique to the department must be satisfactorily completed. All courses taken are considered part of the cumulative QPA, whether they apply to the program or not. Under no circumstances will a student be permitted to graduate if the cumulative QPA is not exactly 3.000 or higher. Students whose QPA falls below 3.000 in the last semester will be placed on probation. These students will be given one semester to raise the QPA to the required 3.000 by taking an additional course(s) above the listed requirements.

All students are required to file an application for graduation accompanied by the $150 fee with the Records Office. Students must submit applications by the first day of class of the fall semester for January graduation, the first day of class of the spring semester for May graduation, and the first day of class of the first summer session for September graduation. Failure to comply with the graduation application deadline will delay graduation until the next semester. Refer to the Records Office website (www.loyola.edu/records) for specific dates. Students who file an application for a specific semester and do not complete the graduation requirements must submit a new application, however, no additional fee is required.

Formal commencement exercises are held each year in May. Only students who have completed all degree requirements are permitted to participate. All graduates are required to pay the graduation fee. Students who complete degree requirements in September and January may obtain their diplomas at that time from the Records Office. They may also participate in the formal commencement ceremonies the following May.

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